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From boxing to business: Chase Corbin

Successful in and out of the ring: Chase Corbin

 

By Amy Green

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Corbin
Corbin

Chase Corbin learned two things growing up in West Philly. How to street fight and, how to make money in those same streets. It wasn’t until he entered the professional boxing ranks that he discovered how to perfect both crafts.

 

Boxing came about when Chase saw a classmate.

 

“I saw a guy I went to school with was boxing, and he was doing pretty good, so I thought I’d try it. I could fight, and I was getting in street fights with bigger guys, so I felt like I had to step it up. And it was a lot harder than I thought.” he said. With practice, Chase had about thirty or forty amateur fights, won Golden Gloves, and some regional titles before going pro in 2009.

 

Eight victories, with seven by knockout in a career that ended in 2013, Chase enjoyed modest success. He fought in California, Arizona and Las Vegas, with a lull between bouts while he reconciled legal matters that stemmed from some of his Philly street business. He was trained by Jeff Mayweather for his last two fights. Mayweather described Chase as “a fighter with a lot of talent, charisma and a devastating right hand, kind of like a poor man’s Tommy Hearns.”

 

Under Mayweather’s guidance, Chase developed into a good boxer puncher, and enjoyed the hardest aspect of the sport- sparring. “I called it on the job training,” he recalled. “Sparring was my favorite thing about boxing. And I had some great sparring with Demetrius Hopkins and I used to like to go to war with Mickey Bey.”

 

In contrast, the least favorite part of boxing for Chase was dieting, and the business of the sport itself. “Definitely the business,” he said and being something of an entrepreneur, realized a boxing career wasn’t adding up. “The numbers,” he explained, and how they dwindle away when a fighter is struggling to make it in their career. “33 1/3 to a manager, ten percent for a trainer, two per cent to the cut man, and thirty percent for taxes. Those numbers alone made me stop boxing. That, waiting on fights between fights and always wondering about the money. I realized during this time; you need to have a Plan B.”

 

Plan B for Chase was put in place for him by his manager, Las Vegas real estate developer Jared Weiss, who he met during his last fights. Weiss offered Chase the chance to work in his office as he trained and between fights, and during that time, he developed an interest in the real estate business.

 

“I was lucky to have a manager like Jared Weiss who was successful and willing to mentor me in regards to business,” Chase said and continued with how Jared further instilled business knowledge in him “I always knew how to make money but not how to keep it. Jared made that transition easier. He taught me real estate, the ins and outs of buying and selling properties, managing rentals. Then we had some air bnbs, I had a cleaning company for the air bnbs, and also flipping those properties.” With Weiss guiding and partnering with him, Chase worked in the real estate market for two years, but had an idea in his mind he had long wanted to make a reality.

 

Italian ices are something enjoyed in Philadelphia, and for years Chase planned his own Italian ice business, from the recipes he created to how he envisioned the marketing.

 

“I always had the PhillyFreezeMe idea, I just had to finance it,” he said. The financing came, from money made in real estate, and in 2017, PhillyFreezeMe happened in Las Vegas. “I opened my store in 2017,” Chase said.

 

“The recipes are mine, all original, over 40 flavors, which include alcohol infused for adults.” PhillyFreezeMe ices aren’t just a taste treat, but Chase had the forethought to consider diet conscious customers. “My products are gluten free, vegan friendly, fat, dairy, sodium and cholesterol free.”

 

Since 2017, Chase has put in endless hours of work, with a staff of six. PhillyFreezeMe has been a presence everywhere in Las Vegas, including huge festivals like Electric Daisy Carnival. But the success was far from easy, Chase admitted. “This has been the hardest thing I’ve ever done in my life, but it’s worth it. I had a profit in the first three months of operation, and I’m not putting out over seventy percent of what I earn.”

 

The mantra of “hard work dedication” that rang out when he was training at the Mayweather Gym seems to still apply to Chase as he labors with PhillyFreezeMe. The store was nominated in two categories in Best of Las Vegas 2019 and Chase will be featured as the cover story of Las Vegas Entrepreneur Magazine in May. But Chase is not slowing down to enjoy these successes. “I will own multiple PhillyFreezeMe stores, but my goal is to tun it into a wholesale warehouse,” he revealed.

 

His flavors are available now for wholesale, and are served in a variety of restaurants. Additionally, Chase has made PhillyFreezeMe available to other budding entrepreneurs. “I have created the opportunity for people to start their own PhillyFreezeMe stand with a package, like a small business startup, with a cart, product, and promotional material.”

 

Combining his fighting skills and self-styled business acumen, along with valuable mentoring, Chase has made himself an entrepreneurial success. Along the way he’s learned valuable lessons he believes fighters should realize. ”Market yourself, save your money and educate yourself in business while you’re in boxing. Because nobody is gonna do it for you.”

 

Get a taste of PhillyFreezeMe next time you’re in Las Vegas at 855 E. Twain Ave., Ste. 118 or on social media, Instagram, @phillyfreezeme, and Facebook, facebook.com/phillyfreezeme or visit phillyfreezeme.com

 

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