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Pungluang Sor Singyu: "I want to fight Koki Kameda"

(Photo © Onesongchai Promotion)
(Photo © Onesongchai Promotion)

By Anson Wainwright


The boxing world always has tremendous respect for any fighter who goes on the road. To win behind enemy lines is never easy and to do, so as a sizeable underdog, winning a world title is even more difficult. That’s exactly what Thailand’s Pungluang Sor Singyu did when he recently travelled to the Philippines and met hometown favourite AJ Banal for the vacant WBO bantamweight strap. It was nip-and-tuck for eight rounds with Pungluang ahead on two cards by a solitary point. Whilst behind on the third, in the ninth round, he took things out of the judges’ hands stopping his weary foe. Pungluang broke down Banal with nonstop pressure, dropping him twice before referee Tony Weeks stopped the beatdown at 1.45 of the round. The 24-year-old, who boxes out of the Onesongchai camp in Bangkok, is currently spending time as a Buddhist monk (yeah, folks, even up against a 14-day vow of silence, I still find a way to smoke these guys out!) before returning to what he does best. So far, Pungluang has run his record to a very impressive 43-1 with 28 wins inside the distance; the sole arbitration was his first (of only two) fight on foreign soil when he lost a split decision to Stephan Jamoye in Belgium back in May of 2009. That experience certainly seems to have put him in good stead and helped the quiet, humble Thai (currently ranked #8 by The Ring magazine) progress accordingly.


Anson Wainwright - You recently won the vacant WBO bantamweight title, stopping AJ Banal in the ninth round. Could you tell us about the fight?
 
Pungluang Sor Singyu - I think he is a very good fighter. I believed I would win.

AW - You had to travel to the Philippines to fight Banal. What was it like for you being the visiting fighter?
 
PSS - I felt OK. I knew I could do it. They took care of us well.

AW - What are you doing with your time now that you have just fought in October?

PSS - I will be a Buddhist monk this Friday for 14 days. Then I must start training again.

AW - It’s early days but several boxers have said they’d like to fight you. When and who would you like to fight?

PSS - I want to fight with the WBA (“regular”) champion, Japan’s Koki Kameda after my mandatory fight.

AW - Who are the key members of your team?

PSS - My manager is a member of the city council in Rajburi Province, Mr. Sor Singyu. My trainer is my cousin. The gym is in Rajburi Province. My promoter is Onesongchai Promotion, headed by Thailand’s only female promoter, Miss Pariyakorn Ratanasuban.

AW - Could you tell us about your typical day?

PSS - Waking up 6 a.m., running 10 km, then spar five rounds, weight-lift 15 minutes. I eat chicken, papaya, spicy and sour Thai foods. I love northeastern foods with sticky rice.

AW - You’re from Uthai Thani in Thailand. Could you tell us about your early years growing up?

PSS - My parents are farmers; they don’t have money, so they go put me in a gym that pays for everything for me. I’m just fighting and the gym takes a share. I love boxing.

AW - How did you become interested in boxing? Presumably, you were a Muay Thai fighter first?

PSS - I am poor and the only way I can gain money is to fight and go to school. Yes, I fought 50 Muay Thai fights.

AW - The bantamweight division is very strong at the moment. What are your thoughts on the current champions and some of the division’s contenders?

PSS - I don’t use Facebook or anything. It is my manager who decides. I’ll fight anyone but I don’t know [the other champions]. Sorry.

AW - Tell us about yourself as a person. What do you enjoy doing away from boxing?

PSS - I have a son, a truck. I like fishing and farming. I have a happy family. I promise if I win the fight, I will go to be Buddhist monk for another 14 days.

AW - Who is your boxing hero and why? Also, which current boxers do you enjoy watching?

PSS - Samart Payakaroon, [former] WBC world [junior featherweight] champion (now a Muay Thai instructor). He is good in my eyes.

AW – Finally, in closing, do you have anything you’d like to add?

PSS - Thank you very much. And I’m sorry I don’t speak much.
 
Questions and or comments can be sent to Anson at elraincoat@live.co.uk and you can follow him at www.twitter.com/AnsonWainwright. Anson is also a member of The Ring magazine’s ratings panel.
 
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